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Selling Grandma’s Vintage Fur

Dear Internet, you are asking me a LOT about how to sell a vintage fur coat. Because I love you and want to help you out, here is a follow up to my piece on Grandma's Vintage Fur. This is for everyone who wants to sell their vintage fur coat, stole, or other item. I'm also posting public answers to some of the more interesting questions that have come my way. The Step By Step Guide to Selling Your Vintage Fur
  1. Identify your fur. This article from eBay is great and has pictures. This page at Furs by Chrys is also fantastic. IMPORTANT: If you think your fur is from an endangered animal, you probably won't be able to sell your fur without breaking the law. Please see my related post about Vintage Furs You Can't Sell.
  2. Check your fur's condition. This article on Worthpoint describes how to do that. They also have an article about repairing a vintage fur. If your fur is in poor condition - torn lining, bald spots, other problems - consider donating it to Coats for Cubs in the USA, or to a local animal rescue group. Your fur will be made into cuddly beds for baby animals.
  3. For a fur in good to excellent condition, identify your best fur resale or regift option, as follows.
  • If you are in or near a big city, try to consign it at a quality vintage clothing store, or a resale furrier, in the autumn.  This is a good example of a resale furrier. Note that resale furriers are, as a rule, more interested in modern furs than vintage furs. You can also try to sell it to a costume rental company or via an antique store that has other clothing.
  • If you are in a remote or rural area, and you don't want to ship your coat for consideration by a resale furrier, post the fur on eBay or Etsy with a detailed listing, including measurements (bust, waist, full length, sleeve length) and multiple photographs.
Be polite to the fur buyers/consignment store owners/possible online buyers of your fur.  Don't be crabby or greedy, don't call a consignment store constantly to see if your item has sold - check in at the end of the consignment term.
Granted, I did want to resemble Mr. Earbrass in my mouton coat days but was probably way closer to Edie

Left to right: Edie Bouvier, Mr. Earbrass by Edward Gorey, Cruella de Ville. If you can't sell your vintage fur coat, you know who to blame.

How Much Are Vintage Furs Worth? Most vintage furs are worth less than $750 US.  This Worthpoint price list seems to be accurate. Here's a list I have expanded from the Worthpoint list, based on reviewing furs online for the past year.
  • Rabbit or Raccoon jacket: $100 - $500
  • Mink coat or jacket: $300-$750
  • Mink or Sable collared 1950s - 1960s wool coat: $75 to $250
  • Fox stole: $150 - $300
  • Mink or Sable stole: $200-$400
  • Mink or Sable collar: $20-$75
  • Mink or Sable boa: $50 - $200
  • Persian or Broadtail Lamb coat or jacket: $50-$450, more with mink collars or excellent condition
  • Mouton Lamb coat or jacket: $50 - $350. I'm a big fan of these personally but they often don't age well.
  • Muff (Fox, Mink, Lamb): $40 – $350. A muff in good condition can go for strangely high prices.
  • Full Pelt (w/heads and feet) Fox stole: $50 - $300
  • Full Pelt Mink/Sable/Marten stole (w/heads & feet): $35-$150
  • Other types of furs in coats, jackets and stoles will usually range from $50 to $300.
  • $1000 and up for a full coat for the following furs: chinchilla, lynx, modern sables especially with provenance such as Blackglama, designer furs.
What can make a fur more valuable? Furs that are labeled designer or are very pale (white, platinum, blonde, champagne) will be at the higher end of these value ranges. What makes a fur harder to sell? If it is a very small size, that reduces the market for it. Brown fur stoles, and fur accessories that include animal heads/feet are definitely harder to sell in 2015 - I recommend taking these directly to a vintage store. I'm Sorry That Your Fur Is Not As Valuable As You Hoped, Here's Why Many antique items are more valuable than their modern counterparts, or have held their value well. Unfortunately fur coats are not one of these. While new fur coats are very expensive, vintage furs have value too, but it is limited. Compared to modern furs, vintage fur coats are heavier. Fur also gets damaged over time - delicate furs like beaver, chinchilla, and rabbit get damaged quickly. Lastly, vintage furs are often styled to vintage tastes - they can be strange or even distasteful (heads and feet and tails, gracious!) to the modern eye. Modern furriers often distance their furs from the killing floor by shearing them to mimic soft velvet, or dyeing them colors never seen in nature.
For actual warmth we are all down with the vintage lady

Victorian fur versus 21st century fur. As you can see, styles have changed.

You may see vintage furs for sale for more money than I have listed above. The catch is that if you are seeing them for sale, in a store...the seller hosting the space is paying overhead costs. If the furs are consigned, the consignee is receiving 50 - 60% of the sale price, and the consignment shop is getting the rest.  If the furs are secondhand, again, they got bought to be resold and there are still space expenses.  Hopefully this explains that. Diamonds also go through value fluctuations due to sale/ownership status. Ethically Donating or Gifting a Fur You may have serious ethical problems with fur, and yet not like the idea of just throwing a fur garment away. It was Grandma's. Animals died to make it. The lining is awfully pretty. Even Edward Gorey had a change of heart about whether vintage furs were ethical! Take heart, there are some ethical re-uses for your fur coat that don't involve profit.
  • Donate to a museum with a costume collection or with a local history collection. This is best for unusual furs or furs with a lot of family history. See my piece on donating clothing to museums here.
  • Donate to a charity that needs animal bedding or does resale, see a USA list here.
  • Ask friends/family members if anyone is interested.
  • Have the fur coat made into one or several teddy bears or other stuffed animals. Here is an NZ bear maker, and here is a USA one (her range of soft fur animals is pretty amazing, and her prices are great). There are enough bear-crafters in the USA that you can find one in your area.
What Is Warmest, Fake Fur or Real Fur? The answer is...neither. If real fur was "the warmest" they'd be wearing it in Antarctica and in Antarctica they wear goose down parkas. That said, after the late-autumn Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeast in 2012, friends of mine were getting their grandmother's fur coats out of storage to wear for warmth. Some Final Notes Just because a fur is "valuable" doesn't mean it will sell. Many people have personal reasons for not buying a fur.  Also...are you so sure you want to sell it? First, you may need to stay REALLY warm someday. And second, beautiful, well-made vintage items are becoming more and more rare. If you have a choice and some suitable storage space, I do recommend hanging on to it. It often takes two or even three generations for an item to become an heirloom. If you are trying to sell a fur, I wish you luck and I hope that this piece was helpful. Rest assured that people have been disappointed by inherited fur coats for years -Dodie Smith's novel I Capture the Castle has a classic scene, set in the 1930s, when two girls inherit some furs. The furs turn out to be, not fashionable mink or fox, but...antique, worn beaver, seal, and...collie dog! Interestingly, Dodie Smith also wrote 101 Dalmatians, where fur coats are a major plot point and a furrier's wife, Cruella de Ville, the villain. Anyhow, read I Capture the Castle, it's a great book. It would be a great gift to accompany a fur teddy bear.

96 Comments

  1. Hello, I have a full length Saga Fur coat, with gold embroidered lining, size 14. It was left to me by my German uncle, his mother owned the coat which was brought in Germany. The coat is about 40 years old and has never been worn and is in perfect condition. Please help me to sell.

    Reply

    • All the help I’ve got is in this article! A recommendation for you specifically: a branded fur with provenance, like your Saga, is perfect for a resale furrier. Good luck and move fast – fur selling season only lasts another month or two!

      Reply

      • Ya know…I’m approving this comment because you can actually help a lot of people on here. Good luck, Cash for Fur Coats.

        Reply

  2. Looking to have repairs to the lining of my mink jacket. Can you help?

    Reply

    • Yes! Lining repairs are easy compared to fur repairs. Most quality tailors can help you out with this one – if they can repair the lining of a leather jacket, they can repair the lining of a fur coat. Problem solved, I hope.

      Reply

  3. I have a full length coyote coat – Neiman Marcus label – perfect condition – about 15 years old, size 10 that I would love to sell. What can I expect to get (if I’m able to sell it)? I live in the mid-Atlantic area – so no need for it. Needed it when I lived in Chicago!

    Reply

    • Bohemian styles and blocky coats are happening right now, which are probably favorable for reselling a coyote coat from the late 90s. Plus, wasn’t Macklemore’s coat in the “Thrift Shop” video coyote? So, probably about the same as for a good quality mink.

      Reply

  4. Pingback: Grandma’s Vintage Fur: Is It Valuable? Is It Ethical? How Do I Sell It? | Ever So Scrumptious

  5. How do I go about selling my black diamond mink coat? Size 34 in good condition valued at R90.000 by a reputable furrier in Johannesburg.

    Reply

    • 99% of my advice is in this blog piece, my dear. There are vintage clothing stores in Johannesburg – Google them and get in touch! They will be able to give you an idea of the local market for furs. Good luck!

      Reply

  6. My aunt left me a beautiful leopard wrap from the 40s or 50s. Can I not sell it at all? Is it true I’m not even supposed to take it across state lines?? Help please.

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  7. I have a full length oscar de la renta full length fur coat. It is off white in color, I think maybe white fox, that is in great condition. I think it may be vintage… The inner label has been cut out but it still has the makers tag. (I saved it from being destroyed) it has pockets and a wide collar. It fits me and I am a size 14. I have no emotional connection to it so I would like to sell it. Can anyone help me on my quest?

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  8. Hi, I have a vintage beautiful fur hat-great condition-my question is I’m not sure who made it what company? Inside on the lining is a gold stamp of the outline of a squirrel in a circle. This looks like a very expensive hat. Also, it is in a hat box (nor sure if it is the original box). The box is a hat box with the monogram on it that says BorR A & Co. If you can help me that would be wonderful. Thank you.

    Reply

    • Hi hon, I can’t do anything for you that Miss Google can’t do, unfortunately! It does sound like the hat may be squirrel fur? Great that it comes with a box!

      Reply

  9. I have a real leopard fur muff, so from what I gather its illegal to sell it, I can’t do anything with it? I also have a black blazer style jacket with short curly hair I think it’s calf could that be correct?

    Reply

    • You are correct – with items like this, made from animals now deemed endangered, I recommend donating them to museums that have natural history or fashion/costume collections. The short curly hair jacket sounds like “persian lamb” and that would be resellable via a vintage outlet.

      Reply

      • Fur has been in existence since our mammalian ancestor – only one ancestor! – evolved in the Triassic, about 220 million years ago. Proto-mammals and mammals stayed small and few until the end of the Cretaceous era, when the dinosaurs became extinct. Humans and our relatives like Neanderthals have worn fur garments for at least 170,000 years. I hope this answers your question!

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  10. Hello I have I believe a scarf, it is longer than a colar, and 2 strips about 2 ft long all lined with marroon silk or satin. The fur is soft and underneath is animal hide. I think its a mink, but not sure so was hoping you could maybe clarify. It is med-dark brownish with black strips. Any info will help thank you.

    Reply

    • Yes, it is definitely on the mink continuum – the shape of mink/sable pelts lends itself very easily to scarves. It might even be a remade stole. Enjoy it, this is very wearable!!

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  11. I have a brown fur cape from J L Hudson in Detroit that I would like to sell. What are these going for?

    Reply

    • Depending on where you are and the quality of the cape, I have seen a range from $25 to $250 on these capes. For a brown one, your resale value probably tops out around $150 if it’s in excellent condition and is made of quality mink. Lots of these “brown fur capes” are made of mink scraps or squirrel fur, which is worth less.

      Reply

  12. We have a black bear fur coat that belonged to my mother in law, who worked at the Stock Market in New York City in the 30’s. (She was born in 1911.) It’s knee length and obviously made for a tall woman. The label reads: “Broadcloth Fashions Exclusive for Jordans”. It’s in excellent condition and the lining looks like silk with a beautiful rose pattern. We want to give it to one of our two sons for his fiance. However, we feel it is important to have an idea of the value of the coat first. We don’t want to slight our other son.

    Reply

    • Well, if it’s a black bear fur, don’t worry too much about it – the value is probably $750 tops. The most important thing is that the fiance welcomes the gift. I often hear from people unhappy or bewildered about the gift of a fur coat they didn’t want and will never wear. Also, storing a coat like this correctly is a significant investment of space. So please ask her first if she’d like it! A welcome gift is better than a surprise in this case.

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  13. My coat is from my motherilaw. I know it was purchased in the 80s in Korea. The marking are Saga. Jindo. Paris, Milan New York. I don’t know what one of coat or the quality. It is stroller length or car coat 70s style. Beautiful!

    Reply

    • Saga is a well -known luxury fur brand – see here – and their main furs were mink, fox, and tankuki/”finnraccoon.” Check the Saga site to identify your fur – because it was purchased in Korea it’s likely that it is finnraccoon.

      Reply

  14. Pingback: Furs You Can’t Sell: what to do with vintage endangered animal fur clothing | Ever So Scrumptious

  15. I have a beautiful full length black mink my mother purchased in Galveston Texas from Eibands department store in 1970. We want to sell to assist my Mom in staying in the home she is currently in. How do I find out how much it is worth. It does not have tags on the inside.

    Reply

    • Well, you are in the right place, reading this post. For a nice classic mink like this, eBay, Etsy, or a local furrier who does resale are your best bets. Check out eBay to see some examples of prices for similar coats. If the fur is sold through the furrier they can verify that it is mink, and help you set a price. Good luck!

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  16. I have a Champagne Fur Coat waist length that is in mint condition is was given to me by my dear friend who was 85 three years ago . It was her mothers who live to 101 years old It is a Schumacher from Portland Oregon.
    How much should I sell it for ?

    Reply

    • Probably about $350 – $450 if you’re selling it directly. You’ll be able to get more for it if it’s a size for a larger lady – there are LOTS of small furs out there. Good luck!

      Reply

  17. I have a vintage fur muff . I am not sure of age but could be pre-Victorian . Consist of 4 mink pelts , 4 heads, 4 tails and 8 feet. In great condition . No tears, no apparent holes or bald spots . The muff has held its shape. Fully lined with original strap and lining each in great condition. Label states ” Roos furs of St. Louis “. I have seen mink muffs including one head and one tail , but nothing like the this one consisting of 4 pelts. I also understand Roos furs changed to Leppert-Roos Furs in 1900. Please advise of suggested value. Thank you.

    Reply

    • Well, it’s hard to say how much your muff is worth without seeing your muff. This one is probably Victorian, which isn’t necessarily good news. The value of a muff is very contingent on where and when you are selling it. For best value, sell in the autumn; to find potential buyers, you will want a city with a good steampunk/Dickens scene, somewhere Northern. Anywhere that’s shoveling itself out this winter! So if you are in Florida, you are better off selling it online. Price it at $250 because of the good lining condition – if the lining is red or purple, that’s even better. You can always lower a price, you can’t raise it. Good luck!

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  18. When my mother died I found a Natural Pastel Female Mink 7/8 coat. Length 37″/sweep 56″. Certificate of fur APPRAISAL I J FOX, Boston, MA/.
    Please give me suggestions what can I do with this fir. I want to sell it but do not know the best way/ and when to sell. Thanks

    Reply

    • Sometimes I get comments like these where people are asking for…exactly the same information I’ve provided in the post above. I recommend that you go back and read the post immediately above.

      So, why didn’t you read this post? I’m guessing that it’s one of two reasons:
      1. A deep belief that the fur is more special than other furs. Your fur may be great, but the information in this post applies even to the highest-end designer sable coat.
      2. I asked myself, “Is this post hard to read?” I went through and made some changes to make it easier to read, especially the three steps involved in selling your fur. I am not going to reduce the length of this post – much of the information is in response to other questions. Anyway, I hope this helps.

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  19. I have used your site a bunch in pricing fur’s for sale but now I have a jacket that has silver muskrat fur trim in lovely condition and I haven’t seen any mention of muskrat fur? I know lighter colors are desirable but was just wondering where muskrat stood in terms of pricing? Thanks for such a great site and any help you can offer 🙂 ~Erin

    Reply

    • I’m so glad this has been useful! Re: your coat – is it muskrat fur or the fur of the related animal, the nutria? Nutria does come in both brown and silver. I would price muskrat/nutria the same as a similar item of Persian lamb, with perhaps a slight boost for its current popularity. Good luck!

      Reply

  20. Hi there I have a black mink coat that was my nana and was wondering how much it might be and where I could sell it thanks Corrine

    Reply

    • Hi Corrine, I suggest you reread the article right above, the one that you have commented on. This has all my advice for you. I note you say “nana” – if you’re in Australia or New Zealand, where grandmothers are often nanas, we are coming up on fur coat selling season. In Australia/NZ your best bet is consigning at a vintage clothing store in a major city, rather than eBay/Etsy/other online sellers. Call them first before you bring the coat in and good luck!

      Reply

  21. I have a tuxedo-style coat purchased here in Long Beach in 12/1988. The body of the coat is black mink and the sleeves and collar and running down the lapels to the hem is black fox. It’s in storage so can’t state the labels. Is it worth anything?

    Reply

    • Yes, and I’d price it the same way as a full mink coat. Leave it in storage until next September, though – autumn is the best time to sell. I hope it’s in cold/chilled storage?

      Reply

  22. Hello! My mother has an authentic Jaguar vintage fur coat from the 1960’s. Was wonderful how much it is potentially worth and where we can sell it whether an auction house or otherwise. I thank you!

    Reply

    • Hi Carolyn – you can’t do a thing with it for financial gain, and you can’t take it out of the country. Dealing in big cat furs is illegal all ’round, vintage or not. See this piece of mine here about Furs You Can’t Sell from endangered or protected animals. The best thing you can do is donate it to a museum (and hopefully get some tax credit). I will be posting a piece next week about how to donate clothing to museums. If your mom has the story of how the coat was acquired, photos of somebody wearing the coat, etc. this will support it as a museum donation.

      Reply

      • Thank you so much for your helpful response! I am a HUGE animal advocate and abhor the fact that she even has it in her possession! We will look into donated it to a reputable museum. I thank you once again!

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  23. i got a fur coat at auction i found it once on the net but can not find it now there are 2 labels one reads taylor maid with a pa seal of honesty the other tag reads taylor”S cleveland can you tell me anything about this item thank you

    Reply

  24. My Mother has a Chinchilla fur coat. Any idea’s what it is worth it is in great condition.. She passed away in March and has three furs that I just do not want to throw away and would like to sell if I can get money for them

    Reply

    • Hi, sorry about your loss. If it’s in good condition (no worn spots, fur is full and lush) I would price a chinchilla coat like a mink coat. Chinchilla is a delicate fur, so the state of the coat impacts the price strongly. Good luck!

      Reply

  25. Have a champagne colored mink stole that was my grandmothers, A silver fox stole that was my mothers & a brown mink collar that was mine. I am 73 & live in South Florida & do not need these items. They are in perfect condition. Lineings are fine & no bald spots. Where should I look to sell these furs? Am I better contacting someone in New York & about how much do you think each is worth. Thank you for your help!

    Reply

    • Those sound like they will sell well. You’re right that they will sell better somewhere colder! Though a champagne stole is such a classic that it might do well even in local “big city” vintage consignment. I recommend posting on Etsy or Ebay, as I describe in this post above. And do wait until the autumn, until early September – nobody will be looking at furs in the summertime. Good luck!

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  26. Hi there, I have an American beaver jacket in the U.S. And I’d like to bring it with me to Australia. Is this legal. I don’t want to risk losing it in customs. Thanks!! 🙂

    Reply

  27. hi. thanks for info you have posted. I am trying to sell three pieces for my aging mother. I am not an advocate of any animals being slaughtered for clothing or any other reason. again, I am only trying to help her sell. she has three pieces all in great shape. one silver fox three tier stole; one Russian squirrel coat and one Russian mink coat. any suggestions or what I might ask if I post on esty or ebay? thank you thank you. patti

    Reply

    • You might want to run the silver fox and mink coat by a resale furrier, unless they have vintage labels. The squirrel coat, unfortunately, isn’t going to have great resale value – I’d try $150, it’s a very “pieced” fur that isn’t what people like nowadays. A 3-layer silver fox stole in good condition can go for $450 – $700, depending, and the coat can go for $350 – $650 if it’s stroller length or $500 – $800 if it’s long. Central Park Vintage has some good indicative prices. Remember to wait until September in the Northern hemisphere, people won’t buy fur until it’s autumn.

      Reply

  28. Need help on value to sell. Mahogany brown minx fur coat. Full length, wide collar that could turn up. Size 12-14 40 years old. No flaws, excellent shape. Also, should it be placed on ebay or is their a furrier that buys. My idea is $950.

    Reply

    • This is my second comment on exactly this kind of coat this week! Same age, same size, a great coat but again I’d price it at between $400 – $500 if you’re selling independently. Because 40 years ago is now the 70s and 70s are hot, I would inquire with a resale furrier. Good luck!

      Reply

  29. Full length dark brown mink coat, red lining. Size 12-14. No flaws even though it is 40 years old,only been worn half a dozen times. Beautiful!
    I want to post it in September but need an expert estimate. No furriers near me. Paid $2000 new. What do you suggest?

    Reply

    • 40 years old makes it a 70s fur and luckily 70s is still happening. I’d like to say $500 but if you want it to sell quickly I’d go for $400 – $450. Like diamond rings, fur coats are usually sold at a loss, not an investment increase. Check prices on other furs in your online venue of choice closer to the time – a style change may lead to a price increase.

      Reply

  30. I BOUGHT A MINK STOLE TODAY AT A LOCAL THRIFT SHOP. $20. IT’S LABEL SAYS RICES FUR SALON. CAN YOU GIVE ME ANY INFO ABOUT THIS LABEL. THANK YOU.

    Reply

  31. Since I heard how they slaughtered some animals I decided to sell my coat. It is a “Gorbi” Swakara – Beaver Sleeves and collar. Bought 20 June 1995. Do you know the value please!!

    Reply

    • All the information I have is in this article, where you’ve commented. You’ll need to do the next step: contacting your local vintage clothing stores or going on eBay/Etsy yourself. Best wishes.

      Reply

  32. hi Sadie
    I have two furs one is made by Dominion Furs and is white and black in colour very soft, the other is brown and black and very course on the pelt any clues as to what i have

    Reply

    • All the information I have is in this article, where you’ve commented. You’ll need to do the next step: contacting your local vintage clothing stores or going on eBay/Etsy yourself. Best wishes.

      Reply

  33. I ended up with my mother’s beaver coat and my grandmother’s mink, neither of which were worth more than a couple hundred dollars (US) each. I have finally decided to have them made into throw pillows. They will not be around forever, but we will curl up with them as we play games or watch movies, and I think my grandmother would appreciate being with us for that…especially if we play some gin rummy.

    Reply

  34. Dear Sadie, We have a beautiful brown mink stole bought in Virginia where the thrift store owner said a widow, whose husband was a film producer in the 1950s, donated it as part of several movie items in a lg box. The box had not yet been sorted when my son spotted the fur. Recently a famous still photographer (Jim Weathers) saw the stole and said it was the most incredible mink from the hundreds he has photographed. It looks new, a 4 pelt wi heads/tails. The label is elegant Doris Day professionally sewed into the pelt, no lining all fur, front and back. This label is not like some we have seen carelessly or sloppily stitched into Doris Day clothing fashions. Based on the information above, we feel it may be authentic as hers. We would greatly appreciate your comments.
    Thank You, Craig & Nancy Drennon (& son, Ken)

    Reply

  35. About 17 years ago I inherited from my mother some furs. A coat, a jacket and some fur pieces. I was told by friends that they are either mink or fox.
    They are in good condition and I want to sell them. I can’t find furriers listed in the Greater Seattle, WA area.
    Question: How can I find out what they are and get an appraisal of their value?

    Reply

  36. I learned alot from your website. Thank you. I have my mother in laws mink coat made by Pollacks Mink Farm. It is tan and honey color and came down to her knees but not all the way to her wrists. It also has her name embroidered in the rose style lining with the pocket under her name. It has always been in the cotton cover and another cover and stored. It is in excellent condition. I have a couple questions. Is this company out of business and if so when? How much should I ask for it? Will her name being on it lower the price? Thank you for any help you can provide.

    Reply

    • Useful questions! Two answers for you: 95% of furriers from before 1975 are now out of business because society has changed so much. The name being embroidered in the jacket makes it MORE valuable/interesting from a vintage perspective. Because of the provenance, you would have better than usual luck donating this to a museum, if you wanted to.

      Reply

  37. Hi there. Great article thank you for taking the time to post it for us. I have two stoles I purchased from a very wealthy estate sale (saks fifth EVERYWHERE) In both the stoles there is a name, Elsie B. I have googled my lil heart out for this name and come up empty handed. In any of your research did you happen to come across this name by chance?

    Reply

  38. I have a full length dyed rabbit fur coat from my grandmother. Late 1940’s to early 1950’s. It is in great shape. Any suggestions on how to sell it?

    Reply

    • All the information I have is in this article, where you’ve commented. You’ll need to do the next step: contacting your local vintage clothing stores or going on eBay/Etsy yourself. Best wishes.

      Reply

  39. Sadie, I am holding a full length woman’s fur coat that is brown in color. It is labeled that is was from “Florence Fur Co., located in Scranton, Pa.” I am also holding a Rabbit jacket, from the same furrier. I believe the Florence company is out of business but the coats appear to be in very good shape.
    My question is this: How can I find out the true value of these two items, and the history of the company, with the company no longer around, and, who can I trust that is a legitimate appraiser?

    Reply

    • All the information I have is in this article, where you’ve commented. You’ll need to do the next step: contacting your local vintage clothing stores or going on eBay/Etsy yourself. Best wishes.

      Reply

  40. I have a full length vintage mink. It is with a gold lining. It sheds when I wear it. Is that fixable and how?

    Reply

    • Hi there – shedding is NOT fixable, I’m sorry. You’ve got a coat that should have been stored in a cold location – storing where a coat can overheat leads to shedding. Um…you’ve got a very sophisticated pet bed liner now?

      Reply

  41. I have a full length fur.The arms and trim are fox and the body of the coat is Persian. All black knee length size 12. What would be the best way to sell and for how much?

    Reply

    • All the information I have is in this article, where you’ve commented. You’ll need to do the next step: contacting your local vintage clothing stores or going on eBay/Etsy yourself. Best wishes.

      Reply

  42. I have a waist level mink coat made in Jamaica ny was my grandma’s prefect condition til this day i want to sell it.how?

    Reply

    • All the information I have is in this article, where you’ve commented. You’ll need to do the next step: contacting your local vintage clothing stores or going on eBay/Etsy yourself. Best wishes.

      Reply

  43. Sadie you are awesome! Thanks for so much info and you have the patience of a saint!!! LOL

    Reply

    • Aw shucks! I’m glad so many people find this post helpful. I was ill and got snowed under with other things, but I’m plowing through comments again…

      Reply

  44. Thank you for the comprehensive information. Your knowledge is indisputable, given given your Earbrass/Gorey reference. I’ve seen a full length mink coat today. Vintage. To be sold at auction. I can’t afford it, but I’m old. I would have bid even more than I do not have if I had not seen your blog. Thank you. It is a beautiful coat. Many ranch-raised minks died for it. They should be seen.

    Reply

    • Glad to save you some money! Yes, that’s the thing about vintage furs…if the animals died, do we waste their lives by not reusing the furs?

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  45. Pingback: Vintage Fur Stoles: Your Questions Answered | Ever So Scrumptious

  46. Sadly reporting that I was unable to compete with a man, undoubtedly an antiques dealer, for the coat. It wasn’t “just” a coat to me – it was “the” coat. I won’t look for another. I wasn’t looking for this one. But for readers, here’s bidding information:

    There was one full-length mink before the coat I wanted came up. That mink, which was in very good condition, sold at this general estate auction for $350. (I thought this was a good sign). ‘My’ coat came up – now, this was an in-person auction visit, and I’d had the coat on, on and off, over the course of three days – an online bidder started at $250. It went quickly to $250, then $300. I bid $300. (With buyers premium and taxes, that translated into close to $400). Before I could think, (which was good, really), the online bidder went to $400, and the man who won the coat, who was present, and who I’m quite certain was a dealer, bid $500. Blink of an eye.
    I cried.

    But here’s the thing: I would have worn that coat, which had already felt a natural part of me, all the time. I would have worn it everywhere but food coops, and PETA demonstrations, (not that I’ve ever seen one). I would have checked my oil while wearing it; put gas in the car…the only thing I would have done to baby it was not wear it I heavy rain. I’d already imagined being buried in it; an elegant ‘leaving’. Given that I would have shortened its life through my “normal” use of the coat, paying more than $400, (which would have been $500 total), would have been absurd, even if I’d had the money. I would have worn it with my pseudo-‘converse’ sneakers. And so it goes…

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  47. Update: My telephone number was left with the auction staff to give to the buyer should he wish to sell it. (Hoping for some exchange of money plus some kind of swap of something I have that he’d want). He called. He said he bought the coat on a whim because the first coat went for so little money, (so why did he increase by $100 when the bid was at $400), and that he was going to cut up the coat and use it as throw pillows on his couch. If I wanted the coat, he would sell it for $1,000. May he rot.

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