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Grandma’s Vintage Fur: Is It Valuable? Is It Ethical? How Do I Sell It?

Now for a much more seasonal post: vintage fur. UPDATE! After oodles of queries I have created a new post, Selling Grandma’s Vintage Fur. This includes a vintage fur price range list for the winter of 2012/2013. You may find answers to fur price questions. I have also created, in January 2015, a second post, Furs You Can’t Sell: what to do with vintage endangered fur pieces.

Vintage fur calls for one's most demented smile. Moment of madness captured by Digitalpix.

Another image courtesy of Digitalpix!

I am dealing with a spate of questions from people about vintage furs. I love both taxidermy and vintage clothing – the stuffed dead animals in my retroish living room make me a go-to person for this.

I know that fur is not a neutral topic! People have strong feelings about it! One time, my fur-clad stepmother had paint thrown on her by anti-fur protestors outside a New York furrier. But, still, the old furs endure, and they are emerging from closets as my friends’ grandmothers pass away, and what do you do with them?

I’ve put together some vintage fur basics, compiled from what I have seen online, what I have seen selling and not selling at vintage clothing stores around the world, and the furs I’ve had through my hands lately.

Lots of information behind the cut about what makes a vintage fur valuable, how to keep your fur, ways to recycle it, and how to sell it.

What makes a vintage fur valuable? A good rule of thumb is that attractive = valuable. All the following qualities add to a vintage fur’s value:

  • It has a furrier’s label in it.
  • The fur’s lining is intact, unstained, unfaded, no holes or only very small ones.
  • If the lining is embroidered, monogrammed, or has pockets = more valuable.
  • Fur is not torn, or tears are repairable. Tears usually happen where two pelts are sewn together.
  • Fur is thick and lush, not balding or mangy-feeling.
  • Fur is not faded. Back in the day furriers were able to dye faded/discoloured spots to match the rest of the fur. But this skill is very hard to find now.
  • Fur garment has held its shape well.

Fur types that are more valuable overall: mink, sable, fox, chinchilla; furs that are very light in color (white, champagne) or very dark (dark brown, black). Persian lamb also has good resale value, as does beaver in good condition. Larger pieces, stoles, wraps, boas, and coats. Vintage wool coats with fur collars do quite well, too.

Fur types that aren’t as valuable: rabbit (also known as “coney”), squirrel, nutria, opossum, raccoon/tanuki, mouton (lamb shaved to look like beaver), coyote. Medium browns and greys. Smaller pieces, such as collars, cuffs, hats, and strung-together mink pelts with the head and feet on.

Furs that may have environmental/endangered restrictions on selling: big cat furs, beaver, seal, wolf, and monkey or gorilla.

Fur muffs are an exception to small pieces not reselling so well; a muff in good condition, especially an Edwardian or Victorian one, can command a startling price. If I inherited a muff I’d keep it as a collector’s piece for sure. Especially a beaver muff. “And this is my beaver muff!”

More fur facts:

  • Rabbit fur and opossum fur, particularly popular during the 1970s, aren’t very durable, so wear with care.
  • Vintage fur stoles don’t fit everyone automatically – they are sized!
  • To repair furs (reconnect pelts, reattach loosened lining, replace fur hooks) use a leather needle (i.e., a special needle made to sew through leather) and waxed thread. I reattached a lining to my one-pelt neckpiece, Minky, using a leather needle. Leather needles are designed to pierce skin, so they will go through your thumb perfectly. Ow! Use a thimble, and sew with care – small stitches, and avoid catching the fur hairs in your sewing.
  • Fur coats and stoles aren’t just fur and a lining. There is padding, felt backing, and sometimes even buckram to strengthen and shape the garment between the fur and the lining. This is important when you are thinking about redying a fur, especially in NZ where leather processing plants will happily toss your fur into the dye vat. Caveat emptor!
  • Ethical new fur? Go for  opossum in NZ and  nutria in the US. These are pest mammals turned into furs.
  • A quality fake fur has some value as a vintage piece. All the rules for real fur apply re: lining, appearance, etc. My stepmother adored fur, but, knowing that young people today aren’t crazy about it, she gave me a synthetic fur coat. That’s another story. A pimptastic one.
  • This guy’s story is a capsule of the history of being a furrier in NZ.

Things to do with Grandma’s fur if you don’t want to wear the full coat/stole and you feel bad about throwing it out (animals died for it!):

  • Have a teddy bear made out of it.
  • Have it “shorn” to freshen and lighten the look.
  • Have cushions made out of it.
  • Have it cut down to a scarf.
  • Line a pet bed with it. (My mother did this for a beloved dog.)
  • Dress up your dressmaker’s form when not in use.

Any vintage fur reworking isn’t cheap, by the way – $50 to $250 for smaller pieces, and more than that to have a coat restyled. It takes specialist sewing machines and experience, hence the cost.

If you want to keep and wear vintage fur, store it in a cool, dark, dry place (a drawer is great) and check it regularly against moths, mildew, etc. Avoid wearing furs in the rain – cold snowy weather is ideal for furs. The best fur color for you is one that provides contrast to your hair. Here is someone stylin’ in Grandma’s coat at Absolutely Mrs. K. – note the high contrast between her platinum hair and the red-brown coat. I’ve seen several brunette women looking great in pale grey stoles.

What if you want to sell it? Wait a second! I encourage you to think twice about letting go of a vintage fur. You may move to Sweden, your taste may change, and vintage things are getting rarer and rarer. If, due to ethics or storage space, you are committed to selling, here’s my advice.

Furs seduce the buyer with the feel and fit as much as with the eye. If Grandma left you a very valuable fur, like a full-length black mink coat, you can talk to a furrier about reselling it through them. To sell most average vintage furs for the best price, I recommend placing furs on consignment at a vintage clothing store that sells furs, instead of putting them on TradeMe or eBay. Don’t take them in for consignment in spring or summer, take them in autumn – winter is also OK.

Who buys vintage fur, anyway? Costumers/cosplayers, costume rental places, and vintage lovers. Glamour photographers are getting more interested in having a fur or two around as well, for models/customers to wear in pinup shoots. So, another resale option is to check prices online, then ask your vintage-lovin’ friends if they are interested. That way, your vintage-lovin’ friend gets a fur, you get some money, and you know Grandma’s stole went to a good home.

My personal stand on the ethics of fur is that I will wear vintage from nonendangered animals (mink, fox, mouton) and I will wear NZ ecopossum fur. Living in NZ, I don’t see people dripping in sables on a regular basis – it’s just not done here. Nor is it cold enough to wear fur like I once did – when I lived in the US, I was very fond of bundling up in those big heavy 1940s mouton coats against the Northeastern winter chill.  In temperate NZ, sometimes, I wear a mink scarf (recycled from a vintage stole), or a silly little one-pelt sable neckpiece, complete with eyes and nose, that I call “Minky.”

More vintage fur thinky thoughts:

The Vintage Fur Debate – Telegraph article, TimeOut article (activist vs. vintage emporium owner!)

Posh Girl Vintage has a message to overzealous activists.

Questions about selling your fur? See this follow-up post, Selling Grandma’s Vintage Fur. This is designed ot answer your fur selling questions and has a sample price list of different fur pieces and types.

126 Comments

  1. You mightn’t be aware that I am a taxidermist-in-training. :D I am looking for specimens, so if you know of any trappers/shooters who are happy to freeze items, please let me know. Living in Auckland hasn’t be conducive to getting hold of projects. :(
    T x

    Reply

    • Teresa, not only is that so totally cool, but I happen to have a dead non-endangered bird in my freezer! It’s a pretty little bird. I put it in a pantyhose leg, like you’re supposed to do, to keep the feathers inp lace. I was going to do something with it, and…anyhow, it’s yours if you want it!

      Reply

    • I just saw your post. I have had a pet Soloman Island Red Eclectus parrot in my freezer for about 10 years. She is still beautiful. I couldn’t bear to just bury her. Would you like see what you can do with her?

      Reply

      • Hi there! Thank you so much for your kind offer and for the most unusual question I have ever received here. It looks like you are in Texas and I am in New Zealand, so, alas, I do not think biosecurity would allow us to do anything. I suggest that you contact a bird taxidermist in your area, or a local museum that has a natural history collection. That way your beautiful bird would support science and maybe even feature in a museum exhibit. Thank you again!

        Reply

  2. I’m especially intrigued by your link to the activist vs vintage shop owner article, as my sister and I were caught in the crossfire shopping at the store in question! A police meat wagon containing several officers was just arriving to deal with some very vocal protesters, as the smokers outside the pub opposite had grown tired of the shouting. As my sister and I walked down the road (which incidentally is home to about 5 or 6 more boutiquey vintage shops, most of which sell fur and leather items, and a quirky jewellery shop with a display of taxidermy crows in the window), we saw the police trying to calm the 5 or 6 protesters, and snuck into the store unnoticed. We had a pleasant browse, I bought a 60s cami top, my sister purchased a cotton summer dress. As we left the shop, the protesters turned on us. Various insults were thrown at us, mostly along the lines of supporting animal torture, and my sister startled me by replying with some pithy comments which I probably ought not repeat here! I was surprised that Beyond Retro was being targeted specifically, as surely a department store selling new fur is a more logical target, and all the other fur-selling vintage stores have somehow avoided censure. I was also surprised at the level of anger directed towards vintage fur, which is considered by most people I know to be completely acceptable.
    I found an adorable mink collar abandoned on a night out once, which I will continue to wear, and I’d probably wear something trimmed with vintage fur, but I’d avoid wearing a long coat, mainly for maintenance reasons. As I discovered to my cost while re-working vintage rabbit fur coats for film costumes once, fur can become a breeding ground for bitey things if kept somewhere too warm!

    Reply

    • Whoa! I agree that a store selling new furs is more logical. And thank you for the fur coat advice!

      Reply

  3. Hi, thanks for the information. Can you advise me on selling a full leagnth (I think seal) coat with a batten linning. It is about a size 12, and looks perhaps hand made. The furr is is great shape, silkey black. The linning needs some repair, but in all it is in good shape. Thank you for any information you might give me.
    Judy Brooks

    Reply

    • Well, I’ll try. Since you’re on AOL, you are probably in the United States, so the first piece of advice is: wait until late September. This gives you time to either get that lining repaired or repair it yourself, because you’ll get a better price for it repaired. (I have done minor repairs on vintage items and then resold them successfully, but then, I can sew.) Seal is a very “vintage” fur. Are you sure it’s not beaver? Are you positive? If you can take a peek at the coat under the lining, the more pieces of fur it is made of, the more likely that it’s beaver, I’m guessing. So I’d sell this as a vintage piece. If you are near a big city full of quirky folks, I would consign the coat at a vintage store. If you are very rural or remote, it is probably more cost/time effective to post it on eBay, with all measurements (chest, sleeve length, full length) and ample photos. If it has a classic 30s to 50s furrier label, be sure and include that in the photos. You might also want to run this one past some costume rental places, especially ones that cater to films. Good luck!

      Reply

  4. I have 2 fur coats that were my Mother’s. 1 is a White Fox coat and the other is a White Beaver coat. They are both lovely. The coats are in greater condition. I have MS and was I thinking about selling them. I really need a car. The car I have is not safe. Could you please advise me on if there is anything I can do? I really need a car so I can still be self-sufficient. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Hi petal, both your coats sound stunning! And just the kind to appeal to vintage lovers – white furs in good condition have such Marilyn Monroe charm. But, I am not a professional furrier. If you are in the US or Europe, in a cold-winter area, you can contact a local furrier. If you accessed my blog, you can Google for furriers and vintage stores in your area. If you are in a big-city area, a resale furrier or high-end vintage store can help you sell them. If you are not in a big-city area, a friend with a digital camera can help you get the furs onto eBay or Etsy. As I noted in an earlier comment, it is the perfect time of year, early September, to get your furs out there, and fur is a noted “theme” for this coming fall and winter. Lots of luck!

      Reply

  5. Pingback: Vintage Precious Jewelry: Understanding, Buying, And (Not) Selling It « Ever So Scrumptious – a femme blog

  6. Hi Our friend visited Russia on a trade union delegation over 25 years ago and brought us back a ushanka (russian ear flaps hat) of mink. It’s been sitting in storage since and now we’re downsizing I want to sell it. It’s still in perfect condition and it cost a fortune way back then. Problem is, I have no idea where to sell it as I googled South Island furriers and only got possum/sheepskin furriers and I don’t have much idea of worth. Any idea apart from Ebay or Trade Me? Thanks for any suggestions!

    Reply

    • South Island is really sticky – ordinarily I would have sent you to my favorite vintage place in Christchurch, but they’ve been out of commission since the quake. Fur is still having its fashion moment though. I recommend cross-checking similar items on eBay and posting it with similar pricing on TradeMe. Also, is the hat mink? If so, say so! Good luck and dosvedanya!

      Reply

  7. I would love some in put I have a full lenght beaver, my mother brought over from Germany. My Grandmother had many beautiful coats. The beaver is over 100 years
    old in wonderful cond. also have a balaro, chimp or gorilla over 100 years old.
    Myself nor my daughters want these coats as we do not wear fur. Does anyone have an idea just ball park what I could sell them for? I can send photo’s

    Thank You

    Reply

    • A 100-year-old beaver coat is in antiques territory. I’d consign with the very highest-end vintage stores – Ziggurat in Wellington, Victorian Gilt in Auckland.

      The monkey/chimp/gorilla fur coat is an ethical dilemma in your closet. Long silky hair is likelier to be monkey fur, and a monkey fur coat figured prominently in the recent movie The Artist, so it’s a good moment to sell it. However, if it’s chimp/gorilla, you may be barred from selling it in New Zealand or overseas, under the international law called CITES, because it comes from endangered animals. Gorilla and chimp fur are specifically banned, and rightly so.

      Something about monkey fur makes me uneasy overall (as does fur from large cats). I don’t mind antique fur in general or modern fur/leather from ethical sources where the whole animal was used, but I’m hinky about monkey fur – and if I’m an example of your market, that is a good indicator of how easy or difficult it may be to sell. If a monkey fur item was mine, I’d donate it to a museum.

      Reply

  8. Pingback: Furs And Money, Part II « Ever So Scrumptious – a femme blog

  9. I live in Kansas, USA. I have about 100 year old full length “baby seal” coat in excellent condition (no tears on outside or in lining). The label says “H U D Product, AL DYED CONEY, TRADE MARK REG * * * , Super Quality”. This was a friend’s Great Grandma’s and we’re in our 50s. I would like to sell it, but have no idea where to start. Can you give me any advice and thank you for your help!

    Reply

  10. Hello there,

    I have a 1920’s/1930’s cream mink coat in mint condition and the cut is to die for. It is handmade, silk lining and embroidered so a very desirable item. I cannot count the amount of people that have stopped me on the streets of London in the Winter months.

    Anyway, I was given it as a gift a couple of years ago because I suffer quite badly from the cold but to be honest, I would rather someone who loved fur could and would own it because it is wasted on me due to my views on fur in general. However, because it is so old and beautiful, it seems such a shame for those little lives to have been ended for nothing and for me to throw it away or burn it, which I have thought of doing on many occasion.

    I do hope you have some advice for me as I’m at a loss as what I should do.

    Reply

    • With compassion for where you’re coming from, there’s three options: sell it, based on the advice in my piece above. Give it away, just as the coat came to you, to someone special that you know. Or, in the UK, you can donate it to the Victoria and Albert Musuem’s costume collection. That way the coat will be appreciated by many people in a historical context. You could even include a letter with your feelings and opinions about the coat and why you donated it – that will probably become a fascinating part of someone’s Ph.D thesis a hundred years from now.

      Reply

  11. I have an antique stole that belonged to my great grandmother (I am in my 50s). I think it’s from the late 1800s. My mother handed it down to me about 35 years ago. She said that it was seal fur. It is handmade. The fur and lining are both in excellent shape and it has beautiful black beading on it. Is there someway I can find out if it’s seal or coney? What is the best way to take care of it? I’d like to find out the value of it, but I plan on keeping it to hand down to my daughter or grand daughter.

    Reply

    • Congratulations! Store it in the classic cool dry place, with some cedar blocks or mothballs to repel moths. For a stole, a spacious wooden drawer is very good. More on fur storage is here.

      How to tell if it’s seal or coney/rabbit? Seal will be nearly unbroken, for a stole-sized garment, like this one. Coney/rabbit will be smaller pieces of fur pieced together.

      Reply

  12. Kia ora,
    My father recently gave my wife a Mink Coat that had been handed from my great great aunty. Apparently she bought it over when the family left Scotland in the early 1900s.. I am assuming it is made from Scottish mink. It seems to be in very good conditionn, shiny mahogany fur with a small hole under the arm. It fits my wife perfectly, so its around a size 10-12. We are really keen to insure it, but i am unsure on how to price it. I couldnt find a label or manufacturer name on the coat. It had been stored in a 1929 ‘Jekmoth-Tropical’ cover and hanger. Any help or direction would be appreciated.
    Thank you
    Julian

    Reply

    • Thank you for writing! The insurance price is based on how you’re insuring it. Are you insuring it as a vintage item? If so, check out the Vintage Mink Coats category on http://www.etsy.com for prices, remembering to convert to NZ currency. Are you insuring it for replacement value? Then…talk to your insurer? I’m not going to say “Google new mink coats of a similar size and color and pick a replacement price” because replacement/new furs are far more expensive than vintage furs. If your insurer says to do that, then hey!

      Your comment makes me think of two things. First, if you’re noting stuff for contents insurance, jewelry insurance is worth an appraisal, with gem and gold prices recently leading to the items being targeted by thieves much more than furs. Second, I am noting that everyone has a tendency to say that their furs are Victorian or Edwardian. But it’s more probable that these furs are from the 1920s onwards. When you are trying to pin down the age of a vintage fur coat or item, consider the following:
      * Does it have a furrier’s label in it? If so, try Googling the furrier – if they don’t still exist you may find other vintage fur items by them, with provenance or age.
      * What is the condition? If it’s really excellent, that increases the chance of the fur item being 1930s or later.
      * When you received the vintage fur, did you receive other items of Victorian/Edwardian provenance? Is there other reliable provenance or history?
      * And, lastly, does the coat look like the modern idea of a fur coat – 3/4 to full length, with fairly straight lines? Victorian fur coats were often capes, or short/medium jackets with marked waists and collars, with frog fastenings, in black or dark brown furs.

      I know how this given-cool-old-valuable stuff goes, I have been given items that were “your great-grandmother’s…maybe your great-great-grandmother’s? From Hong Kong, or maybe India? Did I tell you about my passage out to Hong Kong in the 1950s? I dressed as a showgirl in the ship’s masquerade! Here are the plumes from my costume!” and before I knew it my visit to Grandmother was over and I’d been so distracted by the showgirl anectdote that I hadn’t pinned down the provenance of the item I’d been given.

      Reply

  13. I have a vintage fur stole (sable? or fox?) – it was my mothers. It is large with flaps that come over the shoulders that you put your arms through. It is in excellent condition and lined – BUT I would like to adapt it to a more wearable design – I think it is possible but I would need a fur ‘tailor’ to do it. Is there anyone in Auckland that is capable of doing this kind of work?
    Thank you.

    Reply

    • Hi Suzie, sounds like you have a capelet. I don’t know of anybody in Auckland currently doing this work. I did once have a fur alteration done in Auckland for exactly the same reason, to turn an odd stole into a far more wearable scarf. It was done by an independent lady that someone referred to me. I know this is NO HELP, sicne I don’t have her name and this was 8 years ago, but it shows there are people out there. Try calling the furrier in Dunedin and see who they recommend?

      Reply

  14. lovely article :) very informative! I have a fox fur stole I bought in Finland last year, and having recently gone through a very wet Queensland summer here in Oz, I have discovered some spotting on the black satin lining of my stole that I’m absolutely terrified could be mould. It doesn’t smell though so it may not yet have taken a hold – but do you have any advice for getting rid of it, as my fur set me back several hundred euros and I would be devastated if it were ruined.

    Reply

    • Hi hon! Oh, I am so with you on humidity-based vintage-clothing freak outs. I just bought a dehumidifier specifically to protect my vintage clothing collection. Now, about your fur. Is the spotting on the lining light? You say that it doesn’t smell, which is an excellent sign. Has the overall condition of the fur itself changed, i.e., when you stroke it, are there loose hairs? Does the garment handle more stiffly than when you bought it? Either of those would indicate problems/decay.

      Fortunately for you, there are furriers in Australia, such as Jackson Furs in Brisbane that provide the essential fur maintenance services we lack in New Zealand, particularly fur cleaning and cold storage. They even say they will give you free advice. They sound great, I wish we had them here.

      It’s also a good time to evaluate how you’re storing your fur. Hanging it up in a closet seems natural, but closets are often tucked into low-light areas of houses, which can mean humid closets. If placing it in a deep wooden drawer is an option, you may want to see if that helps. A lovely fox fur a friend of mine gave me is living in a tallboy drawer in my hallway; my mink scarves and neckpieces are in another drawer.

      Reply

  15. i have a beaver fur cape from 1940 in good condition. i need to sell it so I can get rid of it and get some cash. thanks.

    Reply

    • What a flat request, my dear! If you’re in North America, you’ve picked the worst time of year – wait until September at least. Then, read all the previous comments in this thread, and choose the advice that suits you best.

      Reply

  16. Cleaning out boxes from 3 family estates and I ran across a mink? stole. Tag inside reads “Fashioned by Mary’s Fur Salon, Athens Greece”. Fully lined with inside pockets and monogram. Any way to determine how old? How can I tell if it is mink? I am in the US and would like to sell. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Sounds dreamy! For the age, the style is helpful – check out Etsy and look at similar pieces. Also a picture of the tag would help – tags usually have typography fashionable during the period. Using Occam’s Razor, better condition = probably younger, but most mink stoles are pre-1969. How to tell if it’s mink – this basic fur ID guide will help. Worst-case scenarios for “I thought it was mink” are muskrat or weasel, and this link has excellent photos of all three furs.

      Reply

  17. I have a magnificent dark brown top of the range mink coat to sell for my sister in law – she had it made in the US about 12 years ago – by Smith Furs Illinois – it has a hood and is full length with pockets and amazing styling – it is very high end and luxurious and as new – large size – I can email photos – what should I do with it – we are in Australia and I thought maybe more sellable in NZ? thanks for any help.
    I think she paid over $10,000 for it new and only wants $2000 for it now – is has absolutely no flaws and absolutely fantastically beautiful – it is not straight cut to the ground if you know wht I mean but A line – so it is much wider at the base than the shoulders – truly mind boggling feel!….and soft soft soft….

    Reply

    • In a curious coincidence, this is the second of two comments I’ve received on this post that are trying harder than usual to “sell” the fur through me. Julie, you’re polite and the fur does sound fabulous (though I did edit your email address out) so I’m replying to yours as a good example. I recommend you contact the Brisbane furrier referenced in an earlier comment.

      I’d like to make two points here: one is that people reading this post, myself included, usually HAVE a fur already. So that means this comment thread is not the greatest place to try and sell me, or anyone, a fur. If you were in a gifty mood I could help you match up a fur with a museum or with a deserving pin-up girl, perhaps.

      The other is that the value in furs is largely cultural. On a recent icy night in Wellington, everyone had cracked out Grandma’s fur stole to wear, because it was cold enough and furs are fashionable right now. Some people enjoy wearing furs for the beauty and prestige of them. So if you have a fur coat that your culture doesn’t appreciate – a luxury fur like this where the local market is for quirky vintage tippets, for example, or vice versa – use the Internet to find your market. If you can hang on 4 more months, it’ll be fur time in the Northern hemisphere. Good luck! And if you post it on Etsy or Ebay, send me the link.

      Reply

  18. How about donating your furs to help orphaned wildlife? The Humane Society of the US has a program called Coats for Cubs. They distribute pieces of unwanted fur coats to wildlife rehabilitation centers who use it to comfort orphaned wildlife. You can visit the HSUS website and enter Unwanted Fur in the search box. They have a nice article that explains what they do with the fur and how to donate your unwanted items.

    Reply

    • What a fantastic idea! Thank you, Kelly. I can just picture adorable baby predators snuggled up in mink and sable.

      My mother’s 1970s opossum fur coat eventually wound up lining the dog basket of her adored Shar Pei. (Opossum fur can get damaged/worn more than many other furs.) Which shows how we treat pets in our family.

      Reply

      • If you want to see some orphans and furs in action, there’s a youtube video showing how it works. They have some really cute baby raccoons snuggling up in the fur. If you go to youtube and enter Coats for Cubs, it’s the top video that shows up — the full title is something like Be a Humane Hero Coats for Cubs.

        That’s one lucky dog with a fur-lined bed!

        Reply

        • Just a reminder… if you donate your fur you can write it off as a charitable contribution at fair market value!

          Reply

    • I was going to also suggest donating to HSUS, as I did. You will be helping orphaned wildlife & your donation may be tax deductible as well. I would just like to suggest that you add this information to your article as most people won’t be reading all the comments below. THANKS!

      Reply

  19. Hi! I have a shoulder wrap made of mink. My sister and I each received them from a friend of my mothers who was a female radio dj when we were teens. We can’t remember what happened to one of them and we found this one packed up in my mother’s closet.
    It is in excellent shape and I want to sell it to help my mother with finances. How do I go about doing so? Any good ideas would be helpful. Thanks, Gail

    Reply

    • Just to clarify – I am not trying to sell this through this posting – I am looking for information about how to sell it so that I can get the best price for it as I am inexperienced in the art of selling fur.

      Reply

      • Thanks, Gail. First, hold onto it until September or even October, used fur prices in the US are rock bottom with the hot summer. At most, the best-quality mink fur wrap – perfect condition, perfect lining, in a desirable color like white, cream, or black – seems to be worth $300 at most. So this won’t make a big difference to anyone’s finances, I’m afraid. Get in touch with a local vintage clothing store and ask them about consignment, or wait until September/October and post it on eBay/Etsy with attractive pictures, measurements, and the delightful provenance.

        Reply

  20. I have my mother-in-law’s mink stole. It is made with the bodies of 5 real mink, including the head and tail. It has her initials on ribbon that is attached to the back side of one of the mink. I’m guessing it was made around the 20’s. I’m interested in the value.

    Reply

    • One with the heads on! ONE WITH THE HEADS ON!!!! Aaaaaah, these are such taxidermy fun. Alas, the mink-pelt-with-heads-on stoles seem to range between $10 and $75 in value, maybe $100 if they are snowy white mink. You can list them as standard items on Etsy or Ebay, using their instructions. These are also great to consign at a local vintage store, where there’s a higher chance of your item meeting the person likeliest to scream “It has THE HEADS ON!!! Ahahaahah!”

      Reply

  21. I have a 4 pelt (all complete with heads and tails) mink collar stole. It has 1 broken foot, but otherwise is in excellent condition. My mother-in-law, who was 90, passed away and we found this in her things. Just wondering how I go about finding the value of this item. And I guess, wondering if we should sell it. Would appreciate your comments.

    Reply

    • As noted for the previous commenter, these heads-with-pelts stoles don’t have a very high value at best (between $50 – $150). If you don’t have a vintage lover in the family, I’m going to recommend a trip to your local vintage consignment store – your mother-in-law’s estate probably also has vintage clothing, linens, and costume jewelry. Costume jewelry set with rhinestones from the 50s, 60s, and even 70s has gone up in value substantially. Be advised that even vintage perfume bottles and makeup cases have value now!

      Also, folks, if you are asking for fur advice, please mention the fur COLOR. Fur color impacts value.

      Reply

  22. I recently received my Great Grandmother’s mink stole. It is brownish/reddish in color and the fur is in excellent condition. The lining is separating just a little but nothing that can’t be easily sewn. The label says Kalman Furriers Akron, Ohio (United States) and my Great Grandmother’s initials are embroidered inside. I am assuming it is early 1920’s. I have tried to Google the Furrier and cannot find a thing about them online. Was just wondering if maybe it’s because it is so old and maybe the furrier wasn’t in business for very long? Regardless, I was wondering how to find out more about it’s history, like about the furrier and maybe when and where it was made? I am not looking to sell it, I’m a bit of a history nut and wpuld like to know the backstory about items such as this. If you have any tips on finding out fur history I would appreciate it. If not I still enjoyed your article and thank you.

    Reply

    • Very interesting! I’ve found the sister to your wrap on Etsy, also from Kalman Furriers in Akron, so your piece must be lovely indeed. Once upon a time, most towns of size had a furrier and a milliner, the same way that every strip mall today has a manicure place. A lot of furriers and milliners went out of business from the 1960s onward due to changing styles. What you may want to do is contact Akron’s municipal archives and see about going back into their records. Akron newspapers from the time period might also have ads from the furrier. To reattach your lining, you’ll need a leather needle, a thimble, and some sturdier than usual thread. I’ve fixed those fur linings myself, and while it’s doable, be careful – leather needles love to go through the skin of your fingers.

      Once your fur is repaired, store it in a wooden drawer or an acid-free cardboard box. And good luck!

      Reply

      • I am pleased to tell you that while going through another box I found a Black coat with I believe rabbit fur around the collar. It’s 3 quarter length sleeved with a hook clasp as the only fastener in front. It’s beautiful and in perfect condition. This one is also from Kalman Furriers and is Monogrammed with my Grandmother’s name! I love this piece and would actually consider wearing it. What do you know about Rabbit pieces like this? That is if it is rabbit, it is extremely soft and fluffy and mixed colors of black, grey and white!

        Reply

  23. Sadie thank you so much for your response and yes I looked at the other Kalman mink you linked from Etsy and it is almost identical. Mine is in similar condition, amazing after all these years. Thank you for the tip on sewing the lining. I will look into the archives as you have suggested. I’m not sure I’ll ever have the chance to wear it because I live in Florida but I’m sentimental so I will never be able to sell such a piece. Especially since it has my Great Grandmother’s initials so beautifully monogrammed inside the stole. Again, thank you for your advice. This is my first and will probably be the only fur I ever own since it is vintage and a family passed on jewel in my eyes.

    Reply

  24. I have an old mink coat from my Grandmother with very big cuffs on the seleves. I know it is older than me and I am 65. It was made by Davidson’s of Indiana and I would like to find out it’s worth. My Grandmother’s initials are emboridered in the lineing. I love it and it is nice and warm but I live in Florida now.

    Thanks
    Christine Cleveland

    Reply

    • Hi Christine, You’ll note in previous comments that the coat’s COLOR makes a big difference! If it is very dark (black, deepeset brown) or very light (white, platinum, “tourmaline”) those are the most valuable colors. If it is a “wearable size” (bust of 36 inches or larger) that increases the market for the coat. I recommend looking at fur coats under vintage on the site http://www.etsy.com to help you learn more.

      Reply

  25. I have a highly unusual piece. One of a kind. My Mother’s 1st cousin was a clothing designer in NYC in the 50’s – 60’s…she did some custom work for Lucille Ball. She also was a pattern maker for either McCalls or Simplicity. She made many of her designs herself. She created a short black lambs wool cape, hand sewn by her. The cape fits tight across the bodice, had full slits just in front of the arms and hangs loose in the back. There is an intricate elastic strapping system to hold the bodice tight. I live in Florida and have no use for it. It is I wouls say a Small – Medium. Because of the tight bodice, it would not fit a larger woman. I would love to sell it and/or get it to someone who could use, display or otherwise appreciate it. I have photos if you would like to see them, let me know where to send.

    Reply

    • This comment brings up the question of “provenance” for a vintage garment or jewel, or another type of antique or piece of art. Provenance = proof that it is what you say it is, that it has the history you claim. This does sound very au courant, by the way – capes and fur are back this fall in the Northern hemisphere – so by all means this is your season to sell.

      Your garment will be more valuable with provenance. Does it have a label by your mother’s cousin? Or perhaps there is a photograph of her wearing it, back in the day? A letter describing her making it? All these things add to its value.

      If you can provide provenance, congratulations! You can resell this through a high-end vintage reseller. I’d recommend pinging some on the West Coast where the Lucille Ball link will have extra appeal. If you can’t provide provenance, well…that reduces the value, and the “intricate elastic strapping system” would be a tough sell unless you photographed it on a model.

      Our other default option, mentioned in other posts, is donating it to a museum with a costume collection. Again, the provenance makes it exceptionally interesting, and it will be there for historians and fashion maniacs alike to appreciate.

      You are not the first to want your fur to have not just a new life, but a new personal life – to be worn, appreciated, and loved. I may in fact do a post on this…

      Reply

  26. Unfortunately there is no provenance. There is no label AT ALL, which i find interesting. I have photos on a model, and the elastic strapping system is quite easy to figure out. Are there any resellers you can suggest? It is in remarkable condition. Would you like to see the photos?

    Reply

    • Alas, being based in NZ I’m not well placed to recommend resellers to you. If you were willing to Etsy/EBay it with one of the old photos, it would draw more interest than average. Definitely get it out there this season, it is very on trend.

      Reply

  27. Hi there,
    My Grandmother has given me a fur coat that belonged to a friend of hers. It says GLMA – Great Lakes Mink Association on the inside which I found out was merged to become American Legend? It is dark ranch mink and to me appears to be an great condition. I would really like to sell it before it gets ruined by clothes moths! I was considering selling it to a vintage fur shop somewhere in London, if not ebay. Can you give me any sort of idea on the worth of this coat before I approach a buyer? I am unable to pull out any loose hairs and the lining appears in perfect condition to my eyes. It has what I assume to be initials embroidered inside. The coat falls above the knee.
    Any sort of clues on worth would be amazing! Thanks, Amy

    Reply

    • Well, there is the shop earlier in this thread that was being picketed!! In NZ I saw a coat VERY similar to the one you describe on sale at a vintage fur shop for $1000 NZD, which would probably be about 700-ish pounds. If you were selling it via a shop, you usually get 50% of that. eBay or Etsy in the cooler months would net you about 500, so you’d have more profit, but you’d also have a lower chance of selling the coat, since people buy furs based on fit and texture. Seeing a fur in person can be very seductive and this sounds like a real treasure for the right person.

      Reply

  28. Hello, I have been collectioning vintage furs for many years and now I have decided to sell them due to living in the south and never wearing them. Mostly my furs are from the 1920’s-1950’s era. One jacket, that I want to sell is a 1940’s circa Geoffroys Cat fur coat. It is lovely, has its original lining, has a furrier tag and three monogramed initials. I see that this fur is on the U.S. endangered list, however, it is from the 1940’s allowing it to be sold, I think? I read the 1973 Endangered Animal Act fact sheet, however, it didn’t mention the legal sales of 40 year or older now endangered furs. My question is, can I sell and ship this jacket to someone internationally, legally, like the U.K., France, Spain or Italy? Can I even sell this coat in the U.S.? Thank you in advance for any advice and help you can give. Great site you have here, lots of good information.

    Reply

    • No, you can’t ship the jacket: you can’t even sell it in the US on eBay. This sounds like a great museum donation item, that way you will get a tax credit for it, you’ll be following the law on endangered species, and the coat will have a new life.

      Thanks for the site feedback! As a side note, I am particularly sentimental about the Geoffrey’s Cat, after reading about rescuing young Geoffrey’s in Gerald Durrell’s book The Whispering Land.

      Reply

    • I have to disagree to the thought that you can not sell a coat that is endangered as you can, however you will be asked by the agent at your nearest wild life and game office to provide photos, and you may be asked to provide a letter of proof that it was made prior to the ACT.

      Then you will be told that you can only sell it in the State you live in. Now I asked the agent I was speaking to how am I to know if someone in my State is buying it or just someone from elsewhere? So he thought for a minute then said I could ask to see some id from the buyer. So there you go!

      You can sell it but do cover your rear and call wild life and game be up front and they are willing to help. However if you did not have the items made your self as my Wife had 23 coats and capes made, you may not know any furriers who will give you a letter if the agent request one. My knows the one who worked for Revillon when they made the Leopard and most of the other furs so his letter was accepted. Buy the way, many locals love it but not willing to pay what I want so in storage it stays.

      Best of luck,

      LeRoy

      Reply

      • This is really great information, thank you LeRoy. And that’s an excellent note about people loving furs, but not being willing to pay certain prices – vendors take note!

        Reply

  29. I have a short, gorilla fur coat. I am wonderig how to find out if it is definitely real and legal to sell and if so, where and how to sell it. I fixed it up, so it is in great condition. It is definitely dyed. Anyone know anything about this? There isn’t much info on the web. Thx!

    Reply

    • Why would a gorilla fur be dyed? If the fur’s hair is very long it’s probably monkey fur, which might have been dyed to make it evenly black. Does your coat resemble these? If so, go ahead and post/resell based on previous comments and the advice in the article – and ideintifying it as monkey fur. A gorilla fur coat should be donated to a museum, since it’s illegal to sell.

      Reply

  30. Speaking of monkey fur coats… in 1972 my husband bought me a coat from an antique/vintage shop on Melrose in L.A. In my opinion, it is museum quality. The coats Sadie linked to above are similar but my coat is black AND white. Black on top, then a layer of white, then black and finally white. It’s knee length. It weighs a ton. Label inside from Komiss Co. in Chicago. Perfect condition and probably from the late 1930s. One night in the early 70s, when out to dinner at the newly opened Spago on Sunset Blvd, Cher walked past me and said, “I have a coat just like that. Love it!” It is exactly like something you could’ve imagined her wearing! It’s been in my closet for decades now. I know it’s illegal to use monkey fur and has been for years so I always figured it was honoring the monkeys who gave their lives for my coat knowing that no others would be sacrificed for a replacement in some furrier shops. Just wondering too — if they’re illegal to sell how come we see these Etsy and eBay ads offering them?

    Reply

    • Some monkey furs are legal, others aren’t – furs from colubus santanas are legal, and do come in the black/white tones. In the UK, it is currently illegal to import colubus monkey fur, but it’s not illegal to own it. Reputable vendors, like ths one, will note the fur’s legal status in listing. Yours does indeed sound museum/couture cquality.

      Reply

  31. Thanks for the response, Sadie. I probably won’t wear it again and am considering selling it though it holds many memories for me. If you’re interested, I would like to show you a photo but guess I can’t do it on this thread.

    Reply

  32. Greetings, Sadie!
    Thanks for such a great site where I have learned so much today about my vintage furs! Over the weekend, my fiancé and I went to a furrier and looked at new furs, on a whim, mostly, as I just needed a short, fun jacket and planned wool or leather. But, as we passed the furrier store, we decided to pop in and see what was new in furs. I really did love the look offered of some of the new, flirtatious styles as to this point I’d purchased a swing style mink back in the 1980s, another one from Paris of fur, that I lent to my sister and still have to get back, grrrr(!), and another one in dark Mahogany, that, after reading your site, believe it was shorn mink or beaver. That was lent to yet another sister who still has it!

    Anyway, the next day, while antiquing in Wisconsin, we stumbled upon two wonderful mink pieces, a wrap or stole and a full length coat. They are similar in color, a lighter warm gold, with nice linings, monograms, pockets, labels of Albrechts and Dayton’s, both well known stores for quality. My fiancé purchased them both for me! Today, I found a tiny area where the pelts separated and discovered the stamp on the inside of the coat where there is a drawing of an animal profile, F125 Meisel Pelt and other markings that made no sense to me. Upon research, I learned that the Meisel company prepared the pelts for furriers. Is there anything else you can tell me of these markings? I assume 125 may be a lot number or even the number of pelts in this medium size coat?

    I so appreciate all you’ve written to educate us that I wanted to pass on my experience in finding these markings and hope to learn more of what they mean.

    Next on my list are long leather camel gloves with a matching silk scarf for my stole. I love the opera and the very next time I go, I shall be wearing my new find!

    Btw, any thoughts on furs hats? I’d love to get something to complement my new coats and my (also new ; ) red auburn hair! Anything to watch for, to note beyond the obvious, clean and good condition, when seeking them?

    Thanks again! Such a pleasure to have found your blog!

    Cheers!
    Ginger

    Reply

  33. Have a farm raised fox fur coat dyed Black. Great shape inside and out. Has egg shaped difffrent patterns throughout the lining if that might help identify a maker. Atleast 50 yrs old.
    Anyone have a idea n the value.

    Reply

    • Looking at Etsy, vintage fox fur coats range between $200 and $2000, with most in the 3-400 range. Natural seems to be more valuable than dyed, but the black coats are very typical of the 40s – 50s. Check it out yourself and see if you can find a similar coat!

      Reply

  34. Pingback: Fur: To wear or not to wear « My Fashion Hub

  35. Pingback: Fur: To wear or not to wear | My Fashion Hub

  36. My grandmother left me a fur coat when she passed. I’m curious to know what kind of fur it is. Thinking of selling it. The tag says Saxton Hall 1915 50 SIZE18. I would very much appreciate any thoughts u might have on it. Please and thank you!

    Reply

  37. Pingback: Selling Grandma’s Vintage Fur | Ever So Scrumptious

    • I have a vintage mink stole….that my grandfather gave my grandma a very long time ago. Excellent condition. It’s a Franklin& Simon of FIFTH AVENUR. It is a Natural Ranch.Mink. Lining is intact. Reading several sites,,,,,and all these responses,,,im totally confused. Im 5’10& 3/4″ ,135lbs , and it fits me great. Im just not sure I care to wear it. With all the rude people out there. And their ignorant comments reguarding fur. Hoe can I get a factual estimate,,,as to what it’s worth. I can and will send pics if needed…..This particular stole,,,,,reminds me of something Sarah.Jessica Parker could pull of wearing,,,but not me…….

      Reply

      • It does sound ravishing! I did a post recently that includes a vintage fur price list, see here! Sounds like this fur is worthy of being at the higher end of the mink wrap/stole price range.

        Reply

    • Are you interested in buying fur? A baby seal, white parka, wolf collar, pockets, monogrammed, furrier’s label in Anchorage, bought there in 1979?
      Carole

      Reply

      • I’ve said it before but it’s worth repeating: no, I don’t want to buy anybody’s fur. Your fur’s provenance is a bit odd too, because seal fur became illegal to sell in the US in 1972. If it really is seal fur, your best bet is donating this to a fashion or costume collection at a museum. Good luck!

        Reply

  38. Hello,
    my grandmother just gave me a vintage mink shawl ( i think) it it a short coat in the sleeves and back but it longer in the front with pockets. There are no tears or holes, its in great condition and the tag reads from sears. She bought it for 299.00 but it retailed for 700.00. I know this because she also gave me the original reciept.
    Please help, I have no idea how to begin to sell this, she gave it to us to help in getting money towards a house.
    Thank you

    Reply

  39. I purchased a full length White Russian wool coat with “opossum” around the neck and down the full length of the coat from and estate sale. What intrigued me was that the original tags were still on it. They were dated 1962 and price was $380.00. There was a note in the pocket that said “made with love for my one and only”. Does 1962 fall within Vintage age? It truly is a magnificent coat in mint condition.

    Reply

    • Wow, that sounds fascinating!! 1962 is definitely vintage, and $380.00 then would be a huge sum now. It sounds fantastic!

      Reply

  40. Hi, I have several mink stoles, some in mint condition, others in need of the lining being reattached around the edges, I have several mink coats, only thing is, my hair is not a good contrast. Then lastly, but not least, is a Black Seal, huge pelt, whitish/gray mink collar. Lastly it has some gorgeous retro buttons, complete with the “diamond” rhindstone.s. I had initially bought the coates and multiple stoles to make a comforter/spread for my bed. I just like the feel of the fur. Its very warm……. Back to my main question, I do have one mink stole in a light color, perfect condition. I have a Large wedding coming up, and was wondering if I wouuld stick out like a sore thumb …. I wanted to wear a red dress {2pm wedding}. What is your opinion?
    Too much out of style or date.?

    I am dying for a leopard, cougar or a lynx full length coat. Retro of course. No more killing, but I would enjoy one that had so bravely given his life so many years ago……….

    Hope I dont sound like a nutcase….. Its after midnight……..

    Reply

    • I think a fur stole with a red dress for a wedding is great! I do recommend going all the way with vintage-evoking makeup and hair. Your friend will love the stylishness and you’ll look great in the photographs.

      I believe you can get rabbit fur coats that are dyed in a leopard pattern? Also check out some of the sheared furs.

      Reply

  41. I THINK ALL YOUR COMMENTS ARE DISGUSTING – THESE ARE BEAUTIFUL ANIMALS – TO RUN FREE NOT BE WORN

    Reply

    • Hi Patricia! I’m sure a lot of people who find this page share your opinion, so I appreciate your comment. One thing about most furs is that they come from predator animals – and predators are a vital part of living ecosystems. They are not “bad” or villanous because they eat other animals. The ethics of vintage furs are complicated or muddied because…the animals involved have been dead for a very long time, often before we ourselves were born. For some, this makes a vintage fur OK when a new one wouldn’t be. For others, a vintage fur from the 30s is as ethically untenable as a human skin lampshade from the same period.

      Reply

  42. I have a Mink coat that goes to the knee this coat is at least 20 yrs old, and in perfect condition and also meets all the prerequisite you outlined, also I have a Red fox stole same years perfect condition with 4 fox, heads all attached together. Could you tell me the worth.
    Thank you

    Reply

    • I’ve got a price list for vintage furs here in this post, hon. Your red fox stole sounds more valuable that usual, but also a challenging sell because of the fox heads. Whenever I wear my fox stole with a head, it gets lots of comments – sometimes people are freaked out. They certainly pay attention to it!

      Reply

  43. Hi, I’m moving back to Auckland from Germany in July and I know from when I lived there before, that it is almost always humid in winter… My washed clothes went on the rack on Monday, and were still damp on Thursday! I want to ask, is there any fur storage in the North Island? I know I will not get a chance so much to wear furs in temperate NZ, but can’t bear to leave them behind. As an aside, I have two Persian lamb coats w/ mink collars (black w/ palomino mink collar, and grey w/ sapphire collar), mink cape, platinum fox stole and short ocelot bolero, all 50 years+. Will any be a problem to bring in to NZ? Can not find this info online anywhere. Thank you!

    Reply

  44. ALSO forgot to ask, will probably sell at a later date, (once I’ve had a chance to say goodbye properly!) do you know where I could sell in Auckland, and is there a market for furs in NZ in general? Thanks again.

    Reply

    • The ocelot bolero may be a problem – check the CITES convention. The other furs should be fine. I can’t find ANY fur storage in the North Island but Mooney’s Furriers in Dunedin might be able to help. I’d also recommend buying a dehumidifier – I use one in my guest room, where I store my vintage clothes, and it makes all the difference.

      Yes, you’d be able to sell these in Auckland at one of the high-end vintage places. See my piece on selling vintage furs and good luck!

      Reply

  45. Hi Sadie,
    yesterday I made the mistake of travelling to London without my coat, which turned into a great excuse for a browse around Greenwich market with the result of the purchase of a rather gorgeous vintage coat, which I believe to be some sort of lamb. It is fitted, 3/4 length, black with a dyed ‘leopard print’ style collar and the fur appears close cropped, wool like. The coat is very heavy, lined in a self print silky material, with a layer of insulating material between the leather and lining. The coat seems to be made up of many rectangular strips or pieces of fur. Unfortunately there is no label.
    It fitted perfectly and I felt was a steal at £35. As the day wore on and the coat warmed up I became aware of a distinctive ‘old persons wardrobe’ smell following me about.
    I wonder if you are able to help me identify the type of coat (I have some pictures) and also if you have any ideas for getting rid of the smell?

    Reply

    • If it IS a fox stole with 6 pelts, and it is in good condition, is is valuable but a difficult item to sell, since many buyers are squeamish about furs with heads included nowadays. It’s more likely that it is a 6-mink stole, though. The minks have long slender bodies between 14 and 18 inches long, and small heads about 3 inches in diameter. Fox pelt bodies are longer, the fur is thicker, and the tails would be long and distinct.

      Reply

  46. By your description I believe it is mink (red ) 5 pelts whole body,. how would one go about selling or having it appraised.. Thank You

    Reply

  47. I have a vintage cape and I was told that it was beaver. I ws made in Waterville New York by Empsell’s. I does have a monogram in it to and is in mint condition. What do you think it is worth and NO I am not selling it, I am just curious.
    Thanks for any information.
    Sara

    Reply

    • Hi Sara! Are you sure it’s beaver? Are you positive? If it’s in mint condition, it may be mouton – sheared lamb dyed brown – which was very popular in the 40s and 50s. Mouton is a bit heavier than beaver, and feels plushy rather than silky. For a beaver cape, I’d price it between $300 and $500, depending. If it’s mouton, about $100 to $200. Check this out for an interesting “before and after” showing both sheared and unsheared beaver fur.

      Reply

  48. I have a 5 pelt red mink stole . can you tell me what its worth ? Thank you.

    Reply

  49. i have 2 vintage honey mink pieces to sell. excellent condition. i dom’t know how to price them. can u help?

    Reply

  50. Have a mutation mink stole in perfect condition estimate age to be somewhere between 50 to 60 years old. Possible older. Has great grandma’s initials and autumn Haze label. What’s the difference in mutation mink and just mink?

    Reply

    • “Mutation” mink is the lighter shades of mink – which are the result of a fortuitous mutation. These shades of mink are popular in 2014, so if you’re looking to sell this on, it’s a good time.

      Reply

  51. I am so glad you have taken the time to post wonderful information. I am in the process of investigating and gathering information to sell a couple of vintage fur pieces. Once I figure out all the information on them I would like to post info here for others to see. This looks like an investigation into the 50’s and 60’s and looks like it will be fun! Thank you.

    Reply

  52. Hi there, do you know anywhere in Auckland to get my fur repaired?

    Reply

    • Depends what the repair is! For a lining repair, most good tailors can handle this. If a few of the pelts have split on their seams, a tailor can open up the lining, repair them with a leather needle, and replace the lining. For a major repair or a very valuable fur I would contact Mooney’s furriers in Dunedin.

      Reply

  53. I have a blue mist tipped dyed Russian Sable 10-skin stole. It was purchased in 1965 at Livingstons in San Francisco. It is in very good condition. I am hoping to sell it…I wonder what ther value is. It is mongramed with initials. Thanks.

    Reply

    • It’s sounding like a very good fur! Important question: is it a stole with the heads/feet included, or a flat-tailored stole? Check out my other piece, Selling Grandma’s Vintage Fur, for answers to your questions – and the best time of year to sell. Good luck!

      Reply

  54. I have just bought a Richer-Moss (Montreal)Fur coat. From what I have gleaned they were around 1940-1960 period, heavens knows what the fur is, but I undid a seam and its definitely real! and weighs a ton.Its in perfect condition complete with a monogram on the perfect linning. Where can I get this appraised to see what sort of fur.Its lovely and soft and Black. Someone thought it might be seal.I never even knew they made coats out of seal, Man.. that’s real scary I live in Hamilton. If you have any information on the said coat and or point me in the right direction, I would be very appreciative Thanks

    Reply

    • If you’ve undone a seam, you can look and see: is it made of very few larger pelts? Then it might be seal. Is it made of lots of smaller pelts? Probably sheared mink. Does it look like it’s made of one or two pelts total? Probably mouton, a dyed sheared sheepskin. If it’s VERY shiny soft fur, and very black, that increases the chances of it being seal: if it is matte, or has a brown tone to its darkness, it’s more likely mouton. Mouton is also quite heavy and was particularly popular in the 1940s.

      Reply

  55. Pingback: Halloween fun !! « Three Quarters & Counting

    • It’s not hugely valuable – between $100 and $300 on Etsy – and you should take it to a specialist fur cleaner. Which may cost you $100 right there! Sorry….

      Reply

  56. Hello,
    My late grandfather spoiled my beautiful grandmother relentlessly and bought her a full length leopard coat in the mid 60’s. It is currently stored in a fur storage vault. We live in Florida where it will not get use. I actually thought about taking it on a vacation to Tahoe a few years ago as I figured no one would ever think it was real but was worried about travelling/packing it and it getting lost or stolen. Is this a sellable item? Able to be shipped over seas perhaps? What is value?

    Reply

    • You can’t sell this due to the CITES convention (see other links in replies) nor can you ship it internationally, or, in some cases, between states. And you’ll have to brace yourself for some very unpleasant reactions if you’re wearing it and people realize it’s “real” big cat fur. It’s hard to value and nigh-impossible to sell ethically – donate it to a museum with a fashion/costume collection.

      Reply

  57. Information requested to resale three fur coats in excellent condition.. Badger… Raccoon… Mink..

    Happy new year
    Thanks😆

    Reply

    • Check out the new menu tag here, “Vintage Fur Information” for several more pieces that will help you.

      Reply

  58. Pingback: Furs You Can’t Sell: what to do with vintage endangered animal fur clothing | Ever So Scrumptious

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